It’s no surprise that the mobile market has been expanding rapidly, especially when compared to the PC/console space. This presents a problem for microconsoles, a platform that seems to exist between the two. It is a balancing act, trying to set a lower price point to compete for market share with PC and consoles, but at the cost of lacking the power that mobile devices can have.

This was the case with the Ouya, a Kickstarter-backed, Android-based microconsole. Its price point of $99 set it apart as a cheaper alternative for console gaming, but it was being outperformed by some mobile devices before it even launched. It begs to question then; How can a device with a console mentality survive in a space with such rapid growth?

In an interview with [a]list daily, Ouya CEO Julie Uhrman spoke about how the company views the Ouya as a platform;

We will always have an Ouya reference device. Think of it similar to the Kindle strategy, or Google’s Android itself,” Uhrman explained. “Ouya is more than just that reference device, it’s an ecosystem that really can live on other people’s devices. One of the focuses this year is Ouya finding ways to bring games to more people, regardless of where they play.



With the Ouya software prepared for integration into other devices, the company has had “conversations” with potential partners at CES recently and is “really jumping into the strategy with both feet this year”.

Expanding into other devices seems to be a good first hurdle to overcome, but the platform needs to be prepared to endure for the long haul. With rumors circulating of Amazon and Apple working on competing products, it is in Ouya’s best interest to evolve the platform so that they don’t get left in the dust by companies with a bigger budget to spare.