A Closer Look At The New YouTube App Reveals YouTube Creators Might Soon Get To Use Licensed Tracks In Their Videos

Late last week Google updated their official YouTube app for Android to fit into their new Material Design standard. On the surface, it looks great but let’s not judge a book by it’s cover. There’s more here than you might think. The guys at Android Police have been digging through the update in their now famous APK Teardowns, and they’ve found some pretty cool stuff.

First of all, let’s talk music. Usually YouTube videos are better when they are not just voice, but have some fitting music in the background. It makes for a more enjoyable and watchable video. While we might all have songs in mind when we make our videos, odds are we might not be able to use it because of copyright. YouTube knows we want to use our favorite songs, and now it seems they have a way to let us use it. Through the app creators will be able to “swap” their current audio track for another one which can include selected licensed tracks. Some will be completely free, others will require an additional ad at the beginning of videos, and some may integrate with YouTube Music Key to give further options. As far as can be told from the app, music will be limited to that which is licensed for play on YouTube. Sounds pretty great right? Well this might not be exactly what you think it is.



Users will likely be limited to completely replacing the audio in their videos for the new audio and will probably not be able to add their own voiceovers to it. While that means this wouldn’t be all that beneficial to someone like us, it does mean that anyone who uploads how-to’s, gameplay, clips, or other videos which don’t require voice overs, this could be very beneficial. So far there’s no official confirmation from Google that this will happen, but the code in the app does make it seem extremely likely, although not everything found like this ever sees the light of day.

Another minor addition to the app found in the teardown is Auto-Resume uploads. This does exactly what you might think. If you start an upload and happen to lose connection, the app will automatically resume the upload when connection returns.

This functionality is not guaranteed to see the light of day, but since the groundwork is there, it’s more than likely coming. Are you excited for it? Let us know in the comments.

Source: Android Police

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