Samsung Has Been Sued In The Netherlands For Not Updating Their Devices

Have you ever owned a device that never got timely software updates? Odds are the answer is yes. Nowadays updates are a hot topic amoung consumers with OEMs like Motorola abandoning some of their affordable devices and others releasing updates well after the next one is available. However around the world, Samsung is well known for pretty slow with their updates, and one consumer advocacy group in the Netherlands is taking action against them for it.

Dutch Consumetenbond is in the process of taking Samsung to civil court over the lack of consistent updates on their Android devices. One of the biggest complaints the group has is that their is no official update schedule available from the company and that they also have not provided security updates for some of their phones which are currently still being sold.

It’s not hard at all to see why this group is so frustrated, as many other users can easily relate. However Samsung didn’t help matters when they stated that the Stagefright vulnerability was nothing more than “theoretical”. The quote below comes from NOS.nl who originally reported on this information.



Samsung notes that there are believed to be no cases where attackers abuse made from Stage Fright leak. “It’s a theoretical problem,” said Gert Jan ter Haar from Samsung. “We think that problem is made larger than it actually is.” Also, two-thirds of the phones that Samsung released since July 2013 already protected against this problem, the company said.

Now there’s a few things wrong with that statement, namely that Stagefright was actually revealed to the public until the middle of 2015, but regardless that is definitely not the kind of attitude we want to see some any OEM regarding a serious security matter.

This lawsuit could end up giving Samsung a push into keeping their devices up to date, but in all honestly, it probably won’t do much. Samsung has plenty of protection against this soft of thing undoubtedly thrown into user agreements and more (which of course very few of us, if any, actually read).

Via: Android Police